Do you know the flags of LGBTQ + diversity?

As Pride Month begins, here is a short, non-exhaustive visual guide to flags that illustrate the diversity of LGBTQ + communities.

Some will be hoisted to the masts of buildings during virtual official ceremonies. Others will be installed in front of homes and businesses, as a sign of pride and solidarity, if they cannot be brandished during public events.

The rainbow flag

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The six-striped rainbow flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

It has great similarities to the Peace Flag popularized in 1961 during the March for Peace between Perugia and Assisi, Italy. Created by American graphic designer and activist Gilbert Baker, the rainbow flag originally had eight bands of color. It was designed for the 1978 Pride Parade in San Francisco.

The lesbian flag

Several versions of lesbian flags have been used and have evolved over time. It was a challenge to find a symbol that everyone rallied around.

One of the first lesbian flags was designed by graphic designer Sean Campbell in 1999. It reclaimed the inverted black triangle and featured a battle ax, a symbol associated with the Amazons.

The lesbian flag designed by Sean Campbell

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

Other concepts adopted the stripes of different shades of pink and red, sometimes with symbols, like that of bright red makeup lips.

A more contemporary version of the lesbian flag.View larger image (New window)

A more contemporary version of the lesbian flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

More recently, a version with orange tints has gained popularity. There are five and seven band versions.

The transgender flag

The trans flagView larger image (New window)

The trans flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

It is the work of American transgender activist Monica Helms and was first displayed at the Pride Parade in Phoenix, Arizona, in 2000. The blue stripes are reminiscent of the color that traditionally symbolizes boys and the pink stripes, that of girls. White in the middle represents those who are in transition from one to the other or those who do not identify with either.

The non-binary flag

The non-binary flag.View larger image (New window)

The non-binary flag

Photo: The Canadian Press / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

It was designed by Kye Rowan in 2014. Yellow represents people who do not recognize themselves in the male-female binary, white, those who identify with several genders, purple is there for those who see themselves between the feminine and masculine, and black marks neutrality.

The flowing flag

The flowing flag.View larger image (New window)

The flowing flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

He wants to reflect the nuances of gender expression, from feminine to masculine, through neutrality and the desire to recognize fluidity.

The asexual flag

The asexual flag.View larger image (New window)

The asexual flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

The very simple design was voted on in 2010 from a number of suggestions, some featuring symbols that not everyone found unifying. The black symbolizes asexuality, the gray represents people who sometimes feel a sexual attraction, the white is there for the sympathizers who are not asexual and the purple, for the community.

The inclusive flag

The inclusive flag.View larger image (New window)

The flag created in 2018 incorporates the colors of the trans and visible minority flag.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

Creation of the American multidisciplinary artist Daniel Quasar, this flag which wants to unite and progressive would have been born by a sleepless night in 2018.

With the bands and colors of the flag classic a tip is added that combines the pastels of the transgender flag and the brown and black, symbol of visible minorities. It takes the concept put forward by the City of Philadelphia a step further, which had added the horizontal black and brown stripes to the rainbow flag, to represent the black and South Asian communities.

The Franco-Pride flag

The Franco-Pride flag.View larger image (New window)

The Franco-Pride flag was used during the Ottawa Pride Parade in 2018.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

The idea was launched by the Fédération de la jeunesse franco-ontarienne (FESFO), which deplored the lack of visibility of Francophones within the Pride movement.

Someone noticed a handcrafted flag that combined the colors and symbols of the Franco-Ontarian flag and those of the Pride flag. The organization was unable to locate its author, but nonetheless promoted the new flag that was launched at the Pride Parade in Ottawa in 2018.

The Two-Spirit Flag

A version of the Two-Spirit Flag.View larger image (New window)

A version of the two-spirit flag

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

There is also more than one version of the Two Spirit Flag. It uses the bands of the pride flag and incorporates symbols and illustrations that refer to Aboriginal cultures. Traditionally, in some First Nations, Two-Spirit people were seen to have both female and male sides, two minds.

The flag of sympathizers

A flag to express solidarity with members of LGBTQ + communities.

A flag to express solidarity with members of LGBTQ + communities.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Graphics: Camile Gauthier

It expresses a message of solidarity with members of LGBTQ + communities and allows everyone to participate in the Pride parades, in a spirit of celebration and inclusiveness.

 
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