A lozenge could help rebuild tooth enamel

A lozenge could help rebuild tooth enamel
A lozenge could help rebuild tooth enamel

THE ESSENTIAL

  • The lozenge is a compendium of everything our tooth enamel needs: a genetically modified peptide as well as phosphorus and calcium ions.
  • Taking one a day helps maintain a healthy layer and two a day helps rebuild enamel.
  • Initial tests on teeth extracted from humans, pigs and rats, as well as on live rats have shown that the pellet is effective.

It’s a small dental revolution that is brewing. American researchers at the University of Washington (UW) are working on the design of a lozenge, which is shaped like a peppermint, which would regenerate the enamel that protects the teeth. Currently, there is no simple way to allow this regeneration. Their clinical trials have just started, but already discussions of commercial applications with potential partner companies have taken place.

Whiter teeth

The pastille is a compendium of everything that our tooth enamel needs. It contains a genetically modified peptide as well as phosphorus ions and calcium. The peptide used is derived from amelogenin, the key protein in the formation of tooth enamel, which covers the crown of the tooth and which is essential for the formation of cement, which makes up the surface of the tooth root. The process of reconstructing tooth enamel using the lozenge is done step by step, micron by micron. Each pellet deposits several microns of new enamel on the teeth using the peptide, which is designed to bind to damaged enamel to repair it without affecting the soft tissues of the mouth.

For researchers, this lozenge can have two applications depending on the need. If the goal is to rebuild the enamel, then it will be better to take two per day. If the goal is to maintain a healthy diaper then a single daily intake is sufficient. This would apply for adults as well as for children. The lozenge would also have the advantage of producing a new, whiter enamel than that produced by currently available teeth whitening strips or gels. In addition, this process avoids the use of hydrogen peroxide used by conventional whitening treatments which can weaken the enamel.

The first positive tests

Initial tests on teeth extracted from humans, pigs and rats, as well as on live rats have shown that the pellet is effective. It is now tested on humans before being marketed if the positive results are confirmed. “We have three goals in the clinical trial, unveiled Professor Mehmet Sarikaya, project leader and researcher at UW’s Department of Materials Research and Science Engineering, in a statement issued on 1is last march. First, demonstrate effectiveness. Second, the documentation. Third, benchmarking – seeing how the whitening effect compares to existing commercial treatments.”

In addition, the team of researchers is working on the development of a gel containing the modified peptide to treat hypersensitive teeth that are the result of weak enamel making dentin and underlying nerves more vulnerable to damage. heat or cold.

Source

lozenge rebuild tooth enamel

 
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