The gene responsible for endometriosis (finally) identified by scientists

The gene responsible for endometriosis (finally) identified by scientists
The gene responsible for endometriosis (finally) identified by scientists

It’s a good news. Research around the disease of endometriosis advance after years in which we floundered. This disease, which concerns one in ten women was until then a great mystery for the majority of the population. Today, American researchers have managed to put their finger on the responsible gene of this chronic disease that plagues the lives of those who are reached. These researchers from the University ofOxford, from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, from the pharmaceutical giant Bayer AG and the University of Wisconsin-Madison discovered the NPSR1 gene.

Hope for non-hormonal treatment

After having identified the gene Using sequencing, the researchers investigated how it was possible to reduce the abdominal pain. Indeed, until now, there was no no treatment (otherwise hormonal, i.e. pill or surgical) to overcome pain caused by endometriosis. In addition to being a real breakthrough, this discovery is the basis of a not insignificant hope: non-hormonal treatment. “The inhibitor of NPSR1 SHA 68R led to a reduction of cell infiltrate inflammatory and pain in mouse models of peritoneal inflammation and endometriosis. Although further studies in non-human primates are needed, the results let hope non-hormonal treatment for endometriosis “ can we read.

We keep hope. In the meantime, take care of yourself.

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Source

gene responsible endometriosis finally identified scientists

 
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