COVID-19: Ottawa assesses assistance measures for businesses and individuals | Coronavirus

COVID-19: Ottawa assesses assistance measures for businesses and individuals | Coronavirus
COVID-19: Ottawa assesses assistance measures for businesses and individuals | Coronavirus

A text by Peter Zimonjic, CBC News

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland argued at the weekend on the show The House on the CBC network, that the reopening of the Canadian economy is going well and that the country is in a different phase of the pandemic.

I was very happy with the employment figures from last week. it’s a different phase from when we were when these programs were put in place. We are now working on what is appropriate in today’s contextsaid Ms Freeland.

A number of financial aids granted by the federal government to individuals and businesses can still be extended in the short term without adopting new legislation.

Business and industry groups believe this aid is still needed to keep the economy afloat.

Ms Freeland said she was consulting economists, business and labor groups, her department and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on next steps, but she also spoke of some uncertainty about the future.

We have to remember that all of us, collectively, around the world, have been very bad at predicting exactly what course the pandemic would take. We must therefore also adopt an approach flexible enough to be able to react to unforeseen developments., she said.

Business assistance

Ms. Freeland is nonetheless optimistic that some emergency programs could end this fall.

The federal cabinet can extend the Emergency Rent Subsidy (SCEL) and Emergency Wage Subsidy (SCS) until November 30. The extension of these programs beyond this date would require the adoption of a new law.

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB) and the Canadian Chamber of Commerce want these extensions to apply to all businesses in Canada.

Many small businesses are still struggling due to the fourth wave of the pandemic, according to the CFIB. She added that only 76% of small businesses are fully open, only 45% have full teams, and only 49% generate normal revenue.

No business owner expects the government to give them eternal support, but they need to know they can count on something until all restrictions are lifted and they can operate again. fully his business. They can’t afford the government to procrastinate until the last minute CFIB’s Corinne Pohlmann said last week.

The CFIB wants the rent and wage subsidies to be extended until March 31, 2022. It also wants the Hiring for Economic Recovery in Canada Program, which is due to expire on November 20, to be extended until the same. dated.

Support for individuals

Three personal assistance programs also expire this week. The Canada Economic Stimulus Benefit (PCRE), the Canada Sickness Benefit for Economic Stimulus (PCMRE) and the Canada Caregiver Economic Stimulus Benefit (PCREPA) are all scheduled to end on October 23.

These three programs can be extended individually or collectively until November 20 by Cabinet decree. Their extension beyond this date would require the adoption of a new law.

Although the New Democratic Party and the Greens have called for these benefits to be extended, CFIB wants them to be adjusted so that they do not deter people from returning to work.

In a recent letter to Ms. Freeland, CFIB mentioned that Canada’s recovery benefit contributes to a growing shortage of part-time labor available across Canada.

While we recognize that many self-employed workers and business owners may still need CRB benefits, many part-time workers earn more from the program than when they work., again indicates the letter.

The group wants the Liberal government to change the program to ensure that no CRB beneficiary earns more than they would if they returned to work.

 
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